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Warsaw European Special Olympics – Multi-Medal Greek Team

The Greek Special Olympics Team brought home a total of thirty-four medals from the Warsaw European Special Olympics: eleven gold, twelve silver and eleven bronze.
Alexandros Stoupakis was the multi-winner of the event, with a total of four golden medals in weight-lifting. The athletics team performed exceptionally well with a gain of nine medals, including the fastest woman’s in the games, Niki Talamaga’s gold medal in the 100 m. event.
Next big date: the Athens 2011 Special Olympics.
(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)

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Greek Basketball Team Wins Bronze Medal

(GREEK NEWS AGENDA) The men’s Greek basketball team yesterday won the bronze medal at the FIBA European Basketball Championship, Eurobasket 2009, held in Poland, by beating Slovenia 57-56.

Spain won the gold medal beating Serbia in the final by 85-63.    This was the second medal for Greece in the last four years, after winning the gold medal in EuroBasket 2005 Championship.  Moreover Vasileios Spanoulis was selected for the All-Tournament Team together with Spain’s Pau Gasol who was named MVP, Serbia’s Milos Teodosic, Slovenia’s Erazem Lorbek and Spain’s Rudy Fernandez.  It has been a great year for Greek basketball as earlier in the summer the Greek Under-20basketball team won the 2009 U20 European Championship by defeating France 90-85, andGreece’s under-19 team won second place and the silver medal at the 2009 FIBA World U19 Basketball Championship in New Zealand.

Greece: Prehistoric Theopetra Cave opens to public on Friday

Theopetra(ANA) Prehistoric Theopetra Cave opens to public on Friday The opening to the public of the prehistoric Theopetra Cave in Trikala prefecture, will be marked with a concert on Friday. Theopetra Cave is a famous archaeological site, and the first excavated cave in Thessaly, with excavations starting in 1987 and continuing to the present. Its deposits begin in the Middle Paleolithic period and continue without gaps until the end of the Neolithic period (3000 BC). Its uniqueness is that in contains, within a single site, the records of two greatly significant cultural transitions: The replacement of Neanderthals by modern humans, and the later transition from hunter-gathering to farming after the end of the last Ice Age. The cave, situated just three kilometers from Meteora, consists of an immense 500 square meter rectangular chamber at the foot of a limestone hill, which rises to the northeast above the village of Theopetra, with a very big entrance 17m wide by three metres high. It lies at the foot of the Chasia mountain range, which forms the natural boundary between Thessaly and Epirus prefectures, while the Lithaios River, a tributary of the Pineios River, flows in front of the cave. Excavations, which have been systematically carried out, have unearthed light geological deposits dating to the Pleistocene and Holocene periods as well as anthropogenic deposits, indicating that the cave had been continuously inhabited during the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic, the Mesolithic and the Neolithic periods. Specimens found, such as coal and human bones, prove that the cave was occupied from about 50,000 BC to 4000 BC, and that temporary use continued during the Bronze Age and historic times up to 1955. Even after that the cave was used occasionally to by shepherds to shelter their herds right up until the excavations began. It is the first time that cave dwelling was recorded in Thessaly during the Palaeolithic period. Continue reading

Decoding the Heavens by the Antikythera mechanism

(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)    antikythera-mechanismJo Marchant, Decoding The Heavens, William Heinemann 2008. Humanity’s need for purpose seems universal.  Regardless of our belief system, perhaps the beginning of winter is the best time to contemplate meaning and purpose.  How affirming and humbling to realize we are still so similar to others from the past.  The Antikythera mechanism (www.antikythera-mechanism.gr), calculated the motions of the sun, moon and planets and predicted eclipses using intricate gear mechanisms created over 2000 years ago.  Now scientists are reconstructing the device and finding that ancient Greek technology was far more advanced than previously thought.  “Historians have often scoffed at the Greeks for wasting their technology on toys rather than doing anything useful with it. If they had the steam engine, why not use it to do work?” But these devices may have been “a way to get closer to the true meaning of things. To what better use could technology be put?” The size of a shoebox, the Antikythera mechanism – a mysterious bronze device scooped out of a Roman-era shipwreck at the dawn of the 20th century, off the island of Antikythera (www.antikythira.gr), has baffled scientists for years and proved to be a  calculator used by the Ancient Greeks more than 2,000 years ago. New Scientist (12.12.2008): Archimedes and the 2000-year-old computer; Ancient computer recreated; Nature science journal (31.7.2008): Streaming video: Antikythera

Archaeological Treasures Revealed in Greece

(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)     Excavations at the “Egnatia Odos SA” construction site near the city of Kavala have brought to light impressive archaeological finds dating from the years of the Roman Empire. Two human and 16 horse skeletons were revealed during the works. Experts believe that the finds are part of a Roman cemetery for wealthy inhabitants, since the act of burial of humans close to their horse was frequent among the prosperous. Other significant finds include four bronze coins dating from the 4th century A.D. as well as two-wheel vehicles (probably used in battle or for hunting) that bears relief representations of Hercules’ exploits.