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Greek Exports Rise to Over 10% of GDP

Exports account for more than 10% of Greece’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), or more than €20 billion on an annual basis, recording a 13% growth rate, according to the Panhellenic Exporters Association.
In a report over export trends in the January-August period, the Association estimates that Greek exports grew by 11% (€18 billion) last year, while the Organisation for Economic Cο-Operation and Development (OECD) has revised upwards its projections for a 9.4% growth rate, from an initial 6%.
Presenting the report, the Association Chairwoman Christina Sakellaridi said the figures “confirm the importance of exporting business activity in the effort towards the recovery of the Greek economy.”

 Greek exports -excluding oil products- surpassed €20.5 billion in the September 2010-August 2011 period, an increase by 13.3% compared to the previous 12-month period. The August export figures represent a 32% rise in fuels and oil products, a 42.5% increase in confidential products, a 15% rise in machinery/transport, a 13% increase in industrial products.
(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)
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Greek Beautiful Minds

Papadimitriou(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)  President of the Hellenic Republic Karolos Papoulias honoured Dr. Constantinos Daskalakis, a 28-year-old postdoctoral researcher, who was recently awarded the 2008 Doctoral Dissertation Award from the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) for his work “The Complexity of Computing a Nash Equilibrium.”  Daskalakis’s dissertation provides an algorithmic perspective on Game Theory and the concept of the Nash equilibrium. In fact, Daskalakis examines whether rational individuals can arrive at a state where no single one of them would be better off switching strategies unless others did so as well.  Such a state is called ‘Nash equilibrium’, in honour of the brilliant mathematician John Nash, who defined it, and is traditionally used in Game Theory. Daskalakis managed to show that in complex systems the Nash equilibrium is computationally unachievable in some cases, answering an algorithmic question that has been open since John Nash’s definition of the concept in the 1950s.  A graduate of the National Technical University of Athens with a degree in electrical and computer engineering, Daskalakis is an assistant professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a member of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.