• Photos from Greece

    Events of Press Office

    Click to go to Events of Press Offce site















  • Advertisements

Greece: Space Travelling Through Science

(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)    Travelling through space and time, exploring oceans and active volcanoes, sightseeing around the planet billions of years ago, as well as other interactive experiences that bring science closer to society are available in research centres and museums all over Greece. Initiatives to communicate research and science to a wider public are increasing, in number and variety, in Greece and the other European countries. Some important scientific attractions that Greeks can enjoy are the GAIA Centre for Environmental Research and Education at the Goulandris Natural History Museum (www.gnhm.gr), the Digital Planetarium at the Eugenides Foundation (www.eugenfound.edu.gr), “Tholos” the new dome-shaped Virtual Reality “Theatre” of the Foundation of the Hellenic World (www.tholos254.gr), the Thessaloniki Science Centre and Technology Museum NOESIS (www.tmth.edu.gr) and the CretAquarium Thalassocosmos in Crete (www.cretaquarium.gr).

Advertisements

The Antikythera Mechanism Reveals its Secrets

(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)      The Ionic Centre is hosting the first exhibition showcasing the renowned Antikythera Mechanism, a display which is jointly organised with the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project and the National Archaeological Museum. The exhibition which is placed under the aegis of the Ministry of Culture, is taking place from October 22 to December 14. The Mechanism of Antikythera – an ancient mechanical object which has begun to be “decoded” scientifically only in the past few years – has attracted world-wide interest and re-writes the history of science and culture, not only for Greece but for the entire world. The history of this extraordinary object begins in the mid 1st century BC, when a ship loaded with artefacts and precious objects, possible heading towards Rome, sinks near Antikythera. About two thousands years later, in the spring of 1900, two fishing boats with sponge divers discover one of the most important treasures of antiquity. Filled with signs and cog wheels, it was characterized early as belonging to the family of astronomy instruments – sometimes as an astrolabe, a planetarium, an instrument used for sailing or a combination of instruments. When the first results of the Mechanism Research Project, comprising of top Greek and foreign specialists, were announced in Athens in the end of 2006, they brought about international interest – an interest which continues today. At the Ionic Centre, visitors will have the opportunity to see the mechanism as scientists see it, using the latest technology, to experiment with the calculation models that were developed and to use the software developed for making the erased engravings on its surface appear.  GoCulture.gr: The Antikythera Mechanism reveals its secrets; Nature science journal (31.7.2008): Streaming video: Antikythera