• Photos from Greece

    Events of Press Office

    Click to go to Events of Press Offce site















  • Advertisements

Christmas in Greece

Traditionally, the Christmas holiday period in Greece lasts 12 days, until January 6, which marks the celebration of the Feast of the Holy Theophany (Epiphany).
There are many customs associated with the Christmas holidays, some of which are relatively recent, “imported” from other parts of the world (like eating turkey on Christmas day and decorating the Christmas tree).
The modern Christmas tree entered Greece in the luggage of the country’s first king, Otto of Greece, who ascended to the throne in 1833 – yet, the tree did not become popular until the 1940s.
In the past, Greeks decorated small Christmas boats in honour of St. Nicholas. Today, they are increasingly choosing to decorate boats, instead of trees, reviving this age-old Christmas tradition. Undoubtedly, celebrating Christmas and New Year’s Eve in Greece is a once-in-a-lifetime experience!
Xmas: A Word of Greek Origin
Where did “Xmas” come from? Some transliterations of Greek spell Christos as “Xristos.” The “X” stood in for the first letter of the word Christ (ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ).
“Xmas” has been used for hundreds of years in religious writing, where the X represents the Greek letter X (chi). While in modern times Xmas is regarded as a kind of slang, it was originally considered to be a perfectly respectful.
Christmas (“Χριστούγεννα”), the Feast of the Nativity of Jesus is one of the most joyful days of the Greek Orthodox Church.
Christmas Elves
Greece’s hobgoblins are called “kallikántzari,” friendly but troublesome little creatures which look like elves. Kallikantzari live deep down inside the earth and come to surface only during the 12-day period from Christmas until Epiphany. While on the earth’s surface, they love to hide in houses, slipping down chimneys and frightening people in various ways.
Throughout Greece, there are customs and numerous rituals performed to keep these hobgoblins away. In Epirus, residents place twelve spindles in front of the fireplace to prevent the kalikantzari from climbing down the chimney.
On Christmas Eve, in the town of Grevena, people place a large log in the corner of the house and set it alight. As the fire burns, lasting until the Feast of the Epiphany, it protects the family from the naughty kalikantzari. On the island of Cephalonia, women burn incense at the front door of their houses making the sign of the cross in order to repel these undesirable “guests.”
The “kallikántzari” disappear on the day of Epiphany when all the waters are blessed, and they return to the earth’s core.
Sweets & Treats
Traditional culinary delights symbolise good luck in the New Year and adorn the white-clothed tables. “Melomakarona” (honey cookies) and “kourabiedes” (sugar cookies with almonds) are the most characteristic. In the past, melomakarona were made exclusively for Christmas, while kourabiedes were prepared for the New Year.
Today, this distinction is not observed anymore and both melomakarona and kourabiedes are prepared and consumed throughout the festive season.
Another traditional custom that dates back to the Byzantine times is the slicing of the Vassilopita (St.Basil’s pie or New Year Cake). The person who finds the hidden coin in his/her slice of the cake, is considered to be lucky for the rest of the year.
At the meal table there is also a special decorated round loaf called “Vasilopsomo” or St. Basil’s bread -which is really identical in form to the “Christopsomo” or “Christ bread” eaten on Christmas Day – and the “Photitsa” or “Lights’ bread” that is eaten on Epiphany.
“Kalanda” or Carols
The singing of Christmas carols (or kalanda, in Greek) is a custom which is preserved in its entirety to this day. On Christmas and New Year Eve, children go from house to house in groups of two or more singing the carols, accompanied usually by the sounds of the musical instrument “triangle,” but also guitars, accordions, lyres and harmonicas.
Until some time ago, carollers were rewarded with pastries but nowadays they are usually given money. Listen to some sound extracts with Greek Christmas carols (Kalanda) from Ikaria Island. Things to Do, Places to Go…. 
A Christmas spirit is taking over the squares and streets of the country’s major cities, as local authorities organise a variety of events and festivities, culminating with New Year’s Eve countdown parties in central squares.
Festivities in Athens revolve around Syntagma Square and its Christmas tree, with daily concerts throughout the season, while the National Garden turns into storybook Magical Forest for children.
Thessaloniki runs the country’s biggest Christmas village: the Helexpo pavilions are hosting Christmas Magic City, featuring shows, workshops and a big Christmas market.
The north-western city of Kastoria celebrates with “ragoutsaria,” the local carnival that starts on New Year’s Day, with every neighbourhood forming a carnival group, complete with brass band. In Agios Nikolaos, Crete, the New Year will come from the sea, with the New Year’s Eve party at the port, and Santa arriving on a boat.
And Holiday Performances
Venues and clubs participate in the Christmas spirit with special holiday performances.
The National Opera’s Christmas rich programme includes the Snow Queen ballet and Hansel and Gretel opera for children.
The Athens Concert Hall hosts the Bolshoi Theatre Academy on December 22-29, in a much-awaited performance of the Nutcracker, and the London Community Gospel Choir on December 27-28.
The recently inaugurated Onassis Cultural Centre presents Jean-Baptiste Thiérrée and Victoria Chaplin in their phantasmagoric yet poetic Invisible Circus, on December 28-30 and January 1-2.
At the Michael Cacoyannis Foundation, on December 27 & 28, the Sounds of Christmas Go Baroque: a festive concert featuring Baroque Concertos.
(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)

Advertisements

Touristic attractions of Naxos

 

 

"Portara", temple entrance-landmark of Naxos town

The island of Naxos is the largest and most fertile of the Cyclades.
Due to its important agricultural production, it was one of the latest to open itself to tourism. For that reason, it has kept its authentic beauty which attracts every year more and more visitors.
Naxos has a great variety of things to offer to the visitor: impressive mountainous landscapes with many isolated traditional villages, some of Europe’s most beautiful golden sandy beaches, a charming capital with its Venetian quarter, picturesque fishing villages, many Byzantine churches, ruins, active night life…
Naxos is world famous for its endless golden sandy beaches with crystal waters situated in the western coast.
Some of these beaches has kept their natural beauty and are considered as some of the most beautiful beaches in Europe: Agios Prokopios, Orkos or Plaka.

Karaghiozis: “Inextricable part of Greek Culture”

Greece is planning to press its claims to Karaghiozis, a shadow puppet theatre character that UNESCO has deemed to be part of Turkey’s cultural heritage.
“Karaghiozis is an extricable part of our culture,” Foreign Ministry’s Spokesperson said, adding that UNESCO allows neighbouring countries to access the same commodity when it comes to intangible cultural heritage.
The issue has prompted an announcement by the Ministry of Culture, according to which, “it is commonly known and undoubted that shadow theatre refers to a cultural tradition which surpasses boundaries and spans through the Balkans, and the broader East, long time before the emergence of contemporary states.

Concerning the Greek version of Karaghiozis, it represents a vivid chapter of Modern Greek culture, which defends traditional values broadly cherished by the Greek people.”

Museum of Shadow Theatre: Museum of Shadow Theatre & Greek Shadow Theatre Group Athanasiou: Karaghiozis-History
You Tube: Karagiozis & Athens Plus (16.7.2010): Greece to stake its claim to Karagiozis show
(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)

Festival of Greek Culture in Tarnowskie Gory (Silesia) 11-28 May 2010

A festival of Greek Culture is taking place in Tarnowskie Gory of Silesia region (southern Poland) from the 11th till the 28th May. The 13th edition of the festival, organized by the Cultural Centre of Tarnowskie Gory, is under the auspices of the Greek Embassy in Warsaw and has been realised with the cooperation of the Press Office.
Various aspects of Greek culture are promoted during the festival, which includes a rich programme of events of high quality, such as lectures, music, cinema, theatre, performances, concerts, dance, discussion-panels, painting, cuisine. Many Greeks that live in Poland and work successfully in various fields (artistic, scientific or economic), participate in this festival, presenting the results of their efforts.
At the official opening of the festival on the 14th May, a message by the Greek Ambassador, Gabriel Coptsidis, who praised the great interest of cultural institutions towards Greece and the high level of their knowledge about Greek history and culture, was read. The Press Attache, Maria Mondelou, has hold a speech, stressing the importance of cultural events dedicated to Greece that are successfully organised in Poland.

Tarnogórskie Makaty, w tym roku poświęcone będą w całości Grecji, a zwłaszcza spuściźnie kulturowej starożytnej Grecji, jak i dorobkowi w tej sferze współczesnego państwa greckiego. Imprezy w ramach XIII Tarnogórskich Makat odbędą się w dniach od 11 do 28 maja. Poprzednie edycje festiwalu poświęcone były m.in. kulturze: Japonii, Litwy, Czech, Węgier i Izraela. Głównym celem wydarzenia jest przybliżenie mieszkańcom naszego miasta i nie tylko, dziedzictwa innych kultur.
Tegoroczny program imprezy zapowiada się bardzo ciekawie. Serdecznie zapraszamy do udziału.
11.05.2010, godz. 18.00 TCK – wstęp wolny
Koncert Anny Faber z zespołem
Artystka jest jedyną harfistką w kraju, która wychodzi poza konwencje muzyki klasycznej. Styl muzyki, który wykonuje, to Etno-pop, inspirowany muzyką irlandzką, bałkańską i polską. Podczas koncertu będziemy mieli okazję usłyszeć największe przeboje muzyki greckiej m.in. Greka Zorbę, Dzieci Pireusu, Manolis Lidakis oraz inne pieśni śpiewane po grecku, w aranżacjach na harfę z towarzyszeniem fletów, gitary basowej, instrumentów perkusyjnych, klawiszy i skrzypiec.
13-27.05.2010 TCK – bilety 3 zł
„Greckie mity w kinie autorskim” –  projekcie w ramach spotkań w Dyskusyjnym Klubie Filmowym „Olbrzym”
13.05.2010, godz.18.00, „Medea” (1986)
20.05.2010, godz.18.00, „Czarny Orfeusz” (1959)
27.05.2010, godz.18.00, „Jej Wysokość Afrodyta” (1995)
14.05.2010, godz. 19.00 Restauracja „Gospoda u Wrochema” – bilety 100 zł
Oficjalne otwarcie makat – uroczysta kolacja. Oprawa muzyczna wieczoru greckiego, połączona z nauką tańców greckich – w wykonaniu zespołu Zorba. Gościem specjalnym uroczystej kolacji będzie znany ekspert i doradca kulinarny – Teofilos Vafidis, który osobiście przygotuje menu oraz poprowadzi pokaz kulinarny potraw greckich.
15.05.2010 godz. 18.00 TCK – wstęp wolny
Wystawa zbiorowa „Grecki horyzont”, poświęcona krajobrazom greckim
Stathis Jeropulos – wystawa malarstwa – Galeria Przytyck Maria Jolanta Serwik – wystawa fotografii „Śladami kolonizatorów greckich” – Hol TCK
15.05.2010, godz. 19.00 TCK – bilety 15 zł
Koncert „Do It” w wykonaniu Jorgosa Skoliasa w duecie z Bronisławem Dużym. Jorgos Skolias inspiracje odnajduje w domenie bluesa, rocka i jazzu, ale również w muzyce etnicznej, od Grecji,  poprzez Afrykę do Indii. Jako wokalista słynie w Polsce z tego, że opanował do perfekcji technikę śpiewania wielogłosowego.
22.05.2010, godz. 18.00 TCK – wstęp wolny
Spotkanie z Włodzimierzem Staniewskim poświęcone doświadczeniom jego teatru w zakresie badań starożytnej Grecji jako źródła europejskiej kultury, technik aktorskich greckiego teatru antycznego, zabytków muzyki antycznej tej kultury, wskrzeszenia tragedii z ducha muzyki.
Pokaz audiowizualnej rejestracji spektaklu „Ifigenia w A…” w reżyserii Włodzimierza Staniewskiego (na podstawie „Ifigenii w Aulidzie” Eurypidesa) z muzyką Zygmunta Koniecznego, z udziałem studentów OPT „Gardzienice” oraz greckich aktorów w ramach warsztatów teatralnych w Europejskim Centrum Kultury w Delphi, w lipcu 2008 roku.
18-26.05.2010, godz. 18.00 TCK – bilety 3 zł
„Kino Greków – filmy greckie” – przegląd greckiej kinematografii
18.05.2010, godz. 18.00 – „Eduart” (2007)
19.05.2010, godz. 18.00 – „Opowieść nr 52” (2008)
24.05.2010, godz. 18.00 – „Ostre cięcie” (2005)
25.05.2010, godz. 18.00 – „Wieczność i jeden dzień” (1998)
26.05.2010, godz. 18.00 – „Grek Zorba” (1964)
18.05.2010, godz. 17.00 TCK – wstęp wolny
Wykład dr Małgorzaty Lorenckiej poświęcony współczesnej sytuacji społeczno-politycznej Grecji.
19.05.2010, godz. 17.00 TCK – wstęp wolny
Panel dyskusyjny „Etyka starożytnych Greków XXI wieku”. Spotkanie inspirujące do refleksji na temat moralności współczesnego człowieka – czy grecka filozofia wciąż może być aktualna w codziennym postępowaniu, czy starożytna etyka ma rację bytu w ponowoczesnym świecie?
W dyskusji udział wezmą:
Dr Piotr Machura (Instytut Filozofii, Zakład Etyki, Uniwersytet Śląski w Katowicach) oraz dr Lesław Niebrój (Zakład Filozofii i Pedagogiki – Śląski Uniwersytet Medyczny)
Moderator: Anna Włodek
20.05.2010, godz. 18.00 Muzeum w Tarnowskich Górach – wstęp wolny
Wykład pt. „Ateny i sztuka grecka w V wieku przed Chrystusem” – prelegent dr Jarosław Bodzek, adiunkt w Zakładzie Archeologii Klasycznej Instytutu Archeologii Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego w Krakowie.
21.05.2010, godz. 18.00 TCK – bilety 30 zł
Koncert „Kraków- Saloniki” w wykonaniu Andrzeja i Mai Sikorowskich. Lider zespołu Pod Budą występuje jako kompozytor, akompaniator i partner wokalny swojej córki. Dziesięć piosenek Andrzeja Sikorowskiego wzbogaconych jest przez kilka utworów greckich śpiewanych w oryginale przez dwujęzyczną Maję Sikorowską.
22.05.2010, godz. 15.00 TCK – zapisy pod nr tel. 32 285 27 34
Warsztaty taneczne i pokaz tradycyjnego tańca greckiego. Poprowadzą: Irena Argiro Tsermegas, Bożena Głodkowska i Tomasz Kozłowski (Towarzystwo Przyjaciół Grecji). Grupa prowadzi zajęcia we współpracy z Akademią Sulewskich.
Warsztaty dla początkujących: nauka podstawowych wersji tańców z Grecji kontynentalnej, z wysp oraz tańców zaliczanych do tzw. folkloru miejskiego.
Pokaz taneczny: tańce z Wysp Egejskich, z Krety, z Grecji kontynentalnej, taniec Greków Pontyjskich oraz pełna wersja miejskiego tańca chasapiko.
28.05.2010, godz. 18.00 Biblioteka Miejska w Tarnowskich Górach – wstęp wolny
Wykład poświęcony literaturze greckiej – prelegent: dr filozofii Ilias Wrazas, literaturoznawca Uniwersytetu Wrocławskiego, grecki pisarz, gitarzysta.
28.05.2010, godz. 19.30 TCK – wstęp wolny
Koncert greckich ballad i poezji śpiewanej w wykonaniu Iliasa Wrazasa. Najchętniej śpiewa pieśni Mikisa Theodorakisa. W 1999 roku został uhonorowany nagrodą „Prometeusz” za szczególne zasługi dla kultury polskiej, przyznaną przez Ogólnopolskie Stowarzyszenie Estradaowe.
Więcej informacji można znaleźć na stronie: www.tck.net.pl

The Hidden Fabulous Greece

greece_insidwe(www.minpress.gr / The Observer , 10.05.09)  Greece has been a popular tourist destination for decades. Despite the mass tourism, quiet villages and deserted beaches do still exist. Nicola Iseard of “The Observer” assembled a panel of experts and persuaded them to reveal their personal favorites of Greece.   The extensive article features secret islands like Kastellorizo in the  Dodecanese, Milos in the Southern Cyclades and Antipaxoi in the  Ionian Sea and hidden fabulous beaches like Egremni in Lefkada Island.   Moreover there are suggestions for special places to stay like Milia Settlement in Crete and suggestions for the best taverns serving traditional Greek food. For the more adventurous ones, the article suggests active escapes like rock climbing in Kalymnos Island. Read the whole article here.

Gourmet Greece: Say Greek Cheese!

(GREEK NEWS AGENDA)  Greek cheeses are among the finest in the world, and many varieties have been accorded protection under the European Union’s Protected Denomination of Origin (PDO) provisions. Feta is arguably the best-known Greek cheese abroad. However, there is a great variety of cheeses, produced in Greece, varying from soft, white and sometimes creamy, to hard and yellow and from salty and sour to sweet and mild. The different kinds of cheese presented below are of Protected Denomination of Origin. History of Greek Food: Cheese; The Greek Cheese Page: www.greece.org  

» Soft, Sour and Refreshing

Greek Feta production abides by very specific rules. It is made predominantly with sheep’s milk, although a small percentage of goat’s milk can be added. It is produced only in specific regions: Macedonia, Thrace, Thessaly, Central Mainland Greece, the Peloponnese, and Lesvos. Kalathaki of Lemnos is similar in texture and taste to feta. It is manufactured from ewe’s milk or mixtures with small quantities of goat’s milk, exclusively on Lemnos island. It has soft texture and slightly sour taste. It is consumed mainly as table cheese, in Greek salad. Katiki Domokou, produced exclusively in the Domokos area, as well as Galotiri, produced in the regions of Epirus and Thessaly are soft cheeses, white in colour and creamy in texture. They both have a sourish and very pleasant refreshing taste. Continue reading